Two DJ’s with a genuine love for the craft and the desire to always make that pure connection with their audience. Rakka (Nicolai Possemiers) and D-One (Daryl Rodulfo), international professional Dj’s and friends for the past 10 years and counting, started Soaked In Soca with one simple objective; to spread their love for Soca music with as many new listeners as possible. What started as a humble party concept a few years ago in Gent, Belgium has evolved into a much bigger and more ambitious project. As Caribbean music and culture are celebrated within Europe, the end game is to see Soca music soar, break barriers and reach unchartered waters. Welcome to your new platform for information and insight into this music and culture we love so much. Whether it be where to party, where is the next carnival or introducing new music, Soaked In Soca is your source for all of this and more.

Soca?

But what exactly is Soca music and where did it come from? Let’s take a quick look and set the foundation.

Soca music is the soundtrack to West Indian Carnivals all over the world. The music that fuels the colour and vibrancy of Carnival, was developed by a Trinidadian calypsonian, the late Garfield Blackman, known in the calypso world as Lord Shorty.

It was around 1972/73 that Shorty developed the new genre by fusing the rhythms of the two major ethnic groups on the island: the Africans and Indians. His aim was to create peace, love, and unity through music by combining the African drums, brass and rhythms with the Indian dholak, tassa and sitar. The earliest spelling of Soca was sokah, the ‘so’ from calypso and the ‘kah’ representing the syllable in the first letter of the Indian alphabet.

 

The earliest spelling of Soca was sokah,
the ‘so’ from calypso and the ‘kah’
representing the syllable in the first letter
of the Indian alphabet.

 

Today soca has long evolved from its early incarnation and has developed into a chameleon-like music that can take on the shape of any other genre it fuses with thereby creating sub-genres such as Ragga Soca, EDM-Soca, Latin-Soca or whatever is the popular sound of the day.

Power vs. Groovy soca

Soca today is often categorized into two main categories; Power Soca and Groovy Soca. Power denotes any soca tune over 160 beats per minute (bpm) while Groovy is of a lower bpm.

Soca stars include the likes of Machel Montano, Bunji Garlin, Fay-Ann Lyons, Destra Garcia, Nadia Batson and Aaron ‘Voice’ St Louis.

Despite its T&T roots, soca has spread across the Caribbean and diaspora with each island and territory contributing its own sound. With songwriters, producers, musicians, and artists collaborating across the waters that divide them, Soca can be considered a true Caribbean music that unites the region.